Posts

Fair Pay Act Investigations

California recently enacted new standards to combat discriminatory pay practices. California’s Fair Pay Act prohibits paying any employee less than the amount paid to employees of the opposite sex, race or ethnicity for doing “substantially similar work.” Employers have the burden of demonstrating that pay differential are based entirely and reasonably upon:

  • Seniority system, merit system, or system that measures earning by quantity or quality of production; or
  • Bona fide factor that is not based on or derived from sex-based differential compensation and that is job-related and consistent with business necessity.

Fair Pay Act Presentation

I recently attended a great presentation sponsored by the Alameda County Bar Association where Hillary Benham-Baker, Jamie Rudman and Carolyn Rashby did an excellent job describing the interplay between the various state and federal statutes, regulations and orders regarding equal pay. Jamie described a speaking engagement where Julie Su, California’s Labor Commissioner, discussed enforcing California’s Fair Pay Act. The Labor Commissioner discussed what questions Deputy Labor Commissioners would typically ask during Fair Pay Act investigations to determine what constitutes “substantially similar work.” I asked Jamie’s permission to share the information, as they represent excellent questions employers should ask themselves when evaluating whether they are complying with the law.

Fair Pay Act Questions To Determine What Constitutes “Substantially Similar Work”

·         What are the actual tasks performed for each job?  What percentage of time is spent on each?

·         What experience, training and education are required for each job?

·         What knowledge is required to perform each job?

·         What kinds and amounts of physical and/or mental effort are required for each job?  Is one job more physical difficult or stressful?

·          What programs, equipment, tools or products are required for each job? What training is needed to use the programs, equipment, tools or products?

·         What is the working environment?  Does one job involve an exposure to hazards or damages?

·         Does one job require supervision of other employees?

·         What is the difference in terms of the job obligations, levels of authority and/or degrees of accountability?

·         What are the programs, equipment, tools or products used for each job?

·         What kinds and amounts of physical and/or mental effort required for each job?

Employers need to understand what constitutes substantially similar work so they can properly evaluate whether or why employees should be paid the same. Pay disparities must be justified by legitimate business reasons.

If you have questions about equal pay, fair pay or any other employment-related issues, contact me at your convenience.

Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman of Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

PAGA Lawsuits Not Subject to Arbitration

PAGA Lawsuits

The Labor Code Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA) authorizes aggrieved employees to file PAGA lawsuits to recover civil penalties on behalf of themselves, other employees, and the State of California for Labor Code violations. Employees pursuing PAGA claims must follow specified requirements. Labor Code Sections 2698 – 2699.5.

Courts enforce employer-mandated arbitration agreements more often than before. Attorneys representing employees generally view arbitration as a less-favorable place for resolving disputes. They usually prefer to be in court. A recent California Court of Appeals decision held that a PAGA lawsuit is not subject to arbitration. The court opened with:

Bernadette Tanguilig, an employee at Bloomingdale’s, Inc. (Bloomingdale’s), filed a representative action on behalf of herself and fellow employees pursuant to the Labor Code Private Attorneys General Act of 2004 (PAGA) (Lab. Code, § 2698 et seq.), alleging several Labor Code violations by the company. Bloomingdale’s moved to compel arbitration of Tanguilig’s “individual PAGA claim” and stay or dismiss the remainder of the complaint. The trial court denied the motion. We affirm. Under Iskanian v. CLS Transportation Los Angeles, LLC (2014) 59 Cal.4th 348 (Iskanian) and consistent with the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) (9 U.S.C. et seq.), a PAGA representative claim is nonwaivable by a plaintiff-employee via a predispute arbitration agreement with an employer, and a PAGA claim (whether individual or representative) cannot be ordered to arbitration without the state’s consent.

Iskanian and PAGA Lawsuits

Bloomingdale’s argued Iskanian was wrong under more recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions. On appeal, the company dropped it’s argument that it was distinguishable from Iskanian because the employee had the ability to opt out of the arbitration process. The court disagreed.

[W]e are bound by the Iskanian court’s interpretation of the pre-Iskanian United States Supreme Court decisions cited by Bloomingdale’s. Finally, we note that the Ninth Circuit has ruled that Iskanian correctly decided the federal question, thus superseding conflicting prior federal district court decisions cited by Bloomingdale’s. (See Sakkab v. Luxottica Retail North America, Inc., supra, 803 F.3d at p. 427.)

An essential point in Iskanian and Tanguilig is that PAGA lawsuits are not a dispute between an employer and an employee arising out of their contractual relationship. “It is a dispute between an employer and the state.” The employee is merely acting as a “deputized” agent of the state. Since the state did not sign an arbitration agreement with the employer, the company cannot force the state’s agent–e.g., the employee–into arbitration.

I can think of a couple of different unintended consequences of this analysis. For now, however, I’m keeping those close to my chest as I have a couple of ongoing cases where I may need to use the arguments. No sense giving away all my trade secrets.

Employers wishing to use arbitration agreements should review the agreements with counsel. Not all arbitration agreements are alike, and employees may be able to void an arbitration agreement as unconscionable. I anticipate seeing many more arbitration cases in the upcoming years. If you have an arbitration agreement you would like reviewed, or if you are considering using an arbitration agreement, feel free to contact the Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman of Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

 

Presentation at EB Low Cost Ed Day

On Saturday, October 29th, I’ll be conducting a presentation at CalCPA’s East Bay Low Cost Ed Day. I’m looking forward to the presentation, where I will discuss Wage & Hour Best Practices – How to Best Advise Your Clients in this Complex Area.

Presentation Topics

  •   Employees v. Independent Contractors
    • Differences
    • Consequences of Misclassification
  •  Applicable laws & Agencies
    •  State v. Federal v. City/County
    • IWC & Wage Orders
    • City/County Ordinances
    • Opinion Letters
    • Enforcement Manual
  • Basic Pay Requirements
    • Minimum Wage
    • Regular “Workdays” and “Workweeks”
    • Regular Rate of Pay
    • Overtime
    • Bonuses & Commissions
  •  Exempt & Non-Exempt Employees
    • Nonexempt Employees
    • Exempt Employees – salary + duties
  • Meal and rest periods
  • How/when to pay employees
    • Time record requirements
    • Pay stub requirements
    • Deductions from pay
    • Payment upon separation
  • Employees In or About the Home
    • Caregivers
    • Other Household Employees
    • Special Rules for Live-Ins

I will be presenting from 1:00 p.m. to 2:40 p.m. at the Crow Canyon Country Club. You can register here and the event is open to members and non-members.

I hope to see you there.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.