Properly Paying Caregivers: SNT Symposium

Properly Paying Caregivers for Special Needs Trust Beneficiaries

I am excited to present Properly Paying Caregivers for SNT Beneficiaries at this year’s Special Needs Planning SymposiumSharon Novak of TEAM Risk Management Strategies, LLC and I will cover:

  • Employees versus Independent Contractors
  • Personal Attendants versus Companions
  • Who is an Employer when Hiring Caregivers
  • Minimum Wage and Overtime Obligations
  • Paid Sick Leave Requirements
  • Payroll Taxes, Unemployment Insurance and Workers’ Compensation
  • Conducting Background Checks
  • Common Myths and Misconceptions when Hiring Caregivers

The presentation will be part of a 2-day symposium, with 14 sessions, 10+ speakers and 2 workshops. Set in beautiful Sonoma, California, you can view the full schedule here.

Properly Paying Caregivers Presentation  Set for Saturday, February 18th, at 2:30 p.m.

Kevin Urbatsch did a wonderful job gathering wonderful speakers, including professional fiduciaries, trusts and estates attorneys and other professionals experienced in handling special needs trusts. I look forward to seeing you all there.

Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman of Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

Marlon Wayans Accused of Discrimination

Discrimination in the Movies

In a recent case before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, an actor working as an extra in a Marlon Wayans movie (A Haunted House 2) claims he was the victim of racial discrimination and harassment. According to Pierre Daniel, the alleged victim, during his one day of work on the movie he was compared to a Black cartoon character and called “ ‘[n]igga.’ ” Wayans filed an anti-SLAPP motion claiming Daniel’s claims arose from Wayans’s constitutional right of free speech. Wayans argued the comments were protected. He claimed the “core injury-producing conduct” arose out of the creation of the movie and its promotion over the Internet.  The trial court agreed with Wayans finding Daniel failed to establish the probability of prevailing on any of his claims.  The trial court entered judgment for Wayans, awarding him attorney fees.

On appeal, Daniel argued that the conduct at issue was not part of the “ ‘creative process’ ” inherent in making the movie because it occurred when the cameras were not rolling. Daniel claimed the comments did not involve the right of free speech or an issue of public interest.  Daniel also argued that even if the statements implicated Wayans’s right to free speech, Daniels established a probability of prevailing.  The 9th Circuit rejected Daniels argument and  affirmed judgment for Wayans.

Marlon Wayans (Wayans) co-wrote, produced, and starred in the movie, which came out in 2014.

Discrimination and Harassment in the Entertainment Industry

This is not the first time the entertainment industry avoided discrimination and harassment claims based on the “creative process.” In 2006, the California Supreme Court threw out a sexual harassment lawsuit against the makers of the hit comedy “Friends”, ruling that vulgar and coarse comments by the show’s writers reflected the “creative workplace” for a comedy with sexual themes.

Employers should not see these decisions as free license to allow racists or sexually inappropriate comments in the workplace. Employers have an obligation to provide a workplace free of sexually or racially inappropriate comments. These “entertainment” cases are outliers resulting from the unique circumstances in the studios. If the same comments were made on a factory floor or a typical office environment, I suspect the court would have gone the other way.

I will use this case in the sexual harassment prevention trainings to emphasize the importance of maintaining an appropriate work environment. The alleged comments occurred in 2013. Four years later Wayans and the other defendants were still defending the case. You can expect they spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to achieve a favorable result. Although the court ordered Daniels to pay Wayans’s attorneys fees, what are the chances that the movie extra has the ability to pay those fees?

If you have a question about inappropriate workplace conduct, contact the Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. We help employers and employees in a wide range of employment disputes, including race and gender discrimination claims.

Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman of Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

Fair Pay Act Investigations

California recently enacted new standards to combat discriminatory pay practices. California’s Fair Pay Act prohibits paying any employee less than the amount paid to employees of the opposite sex, race or ethnicity for doing “substantially similar work.” Employers have the burden of demonstrating that pay differential are based entirely and reasonably upon:

  • Seniority system, merit system, or system that measures earning by quantity or quality of production; or
  • Bona fide factor that is not based on or derived from sex-based differential compensation and that is job-related and consistent with business necessity.

Fair Pay Act Presentation

I recently attended a great presentation sponsored by the Alameda County Bar Association where Hillary Benham-Baker, Jamie Rudman and Carolyn Rashby did an excellent job describing the interplay between the various state and federal statutes, regulations and orders regarding equal pay. Jamie described a speaking engagement where Julie Su, California’s Labor Commissioner, discussed enforcing California’s Fair Pay Act. The Labor Commissioner discussed what questions Deputy Labor Commissioners would typically ask during Fair Pay Act investigations to determine what constitutes “substantially similar work.” I asked Jamie’s permission to share the information, as they represent excellent questions employers should ask themselves when evaluating whether they are complying with the law.

Fair Pay Act Questions To Determine What Constitutes “Substantially Similar Work”

·         What are the actual tasks performed for each job?  What percentage of time is spent on each?

·         What experience, training and education are required for each job?

·         What knowledge is required to perform each job?

·         What kinds and amounts of physical and/or mental effort are required for each job?  Is one job more physical difficult or stressful?

·          What programs, equipment, tools or products are required for each job? What training is needed to use the programs, equipment, tools or products?

·         What is the working environment?  Does one job involve an exposure to hazards or damages?

·         Does one job require supervision of other employees?

·         What is the difference in terms of the job obligations, levels of authority and/or degrees of accountability?

·         What are the programs, equipment, tools or products used for each job?

·         What kinds and amounts of physical and/or mental effort required for each job?

Employers need to understand what constitutes substantially similar work so they can properly evaluate whether or why employees should be paid the same. Pay disparities must be justified by legitimate business reasons.

If you have questions about equal pay, fair pay or any other employment-related issues, contact me at your convenience.

Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman of Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C.

Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law. We cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice over the Internet. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Do not post confidential or time-sensitive information in this blog. The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

The Nuddleman Law Firm, P.C. represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Pleasanton, Oakland, San Ramon, Hayward, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.